Netflix’s live-action Death Note movie is good and I will fight anyone who tells me otherwise


Netflix’s live-action Death Note movie is good. Not ironically good, or good-for-an-adaptation, or so-bad-it’s-good. Just… good.

And yet I’ve heard so much backlash from the anime community (read: not fan community, but the anime community as a whole), nitpicking over how it isn’t a 1:1 adaptation, how everyone in the cast has been whitewashed (and I guess “blackwashed” in the case of the character of L), among what’s probably a million other arguments for why this movie shouldn’t have been made. Even before official production on the movie began, it had so many cards stacked against it. So of course, if you can’t please the core audience most likely to be interested in the movie, then what’s the point?
But even with all that in mind, I still stand by my statement. Netflix’s Death Note movie is a good movie. Why? Because it’s able to distance itself from the rose-tinted expectations of fans and actually capture Death Note’s essence—an essence that a lot of fans tend to avoid entirely.

Similar to how shonen manga are so much more than their surface-level fights and are able to really delve into more complex themes of friendship, humanity, and even politics, so too does Death Note’s initial allure give way to “ulterior” themes for those willing to dig past its grimdark exterior. At its surface, the original Death Note manga comes off as this giant artsy-fartsy showdown of the minds—this really clever story of cat-and-mouse that touches on themes of morality and godlihood. Its main character is a hyper-intelligent, unflawed high-schooler who oh-so-cooly takes it upon himself to judge the wicked. It is probably one of the most unapologetically pompous shonen series in recent history starring a Barry Sue protagonist with everyone else bending to his will. But it’s for that very same reason that a lot of high-schoolers were drawn towards it. And probably why a lot of fans look back on the series with the same kind of disdain as something like Linkin Park (pre-Chester’s untimely death, anyway)—because the series at its surface is so caught up in its own srs bsns drama, that in hindsight, we can’t help but view the series as nothing more than “baby’s first serious non-punchy manga.”

But what if Death Note wasn’t as serious as people remember it being? What if beyond its blatant religious imagery and rambling monologues on morality, the series was nothing more than a B-movie complete with over-the-top deaths thinly justified through the existence of a magical killing notebook?


That’s what Netflix’s Death Note realizes, and it brings that into the spotlight in full force.

Rather than the perfectly perfect Light Yagami, we have a purposefully whiny shitstain that is Light Turner. Rather than seeking out godlihood, he uses it as an excuse to get in the pants of a one Mia Sutton (who sidenote: is a large step up from the original’s Misa Amane). Rather than the in-your-face mental face-offs between Light and L, the movie’s centerpieces are its Final Destination-esque criminal deaths. The movie strips away any of the original’s subtlety to the benefit of better getting across that Death Note was never about answering nth level questions on life, death, killing, etc, but to centerpiece an unlikeable person’s fall from grace via the most in-your-face, gratuitous visuals and laughably serious demon lore. It embraces its campiness, and is able to utilize it to its full extent, resulting in a beautifully shot, dutch-angle-filled, oddly 80s soundtracky, CW-tier-acting, romp of a movie where you’re absolutely certain Willem Dafoe enjoyed his role playing a slightly less gremlin-faced version of himself.

I’m glad it’s in talks for getting a sequel and I spit in the face of anyone that says the original has aged well enough to the point that they’d prefer that over this.

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I thought Spider-Man Homecoming wasn’t all that great, but at least hear me out on this

Even disregarding superhero burnout, and fanboy wanking, I just couldn’t enjoy Spider-Man: Homecoming.

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My Two Cents on the Iron Fist Debacle

Lemme first say I have no interest in watching Iron Fist. Being panned across the board aside, I just don’t have time to invest 13+ hours into a series that’s ultimately homework for whenever Netflix/Marvel releases The Defenders.

Rather, I’d like to bring up how Netflix’s previous Marvel series have proven that a socially conscious series can work and yet for some reason wasn’t the logical path to take come time to adapt Iron Fist for a modern audience.

Whether it be a black man, woman, or blind man, each previous Netflix series was able to take a marginalized group of people and empower them without coming off as too obnoxious about it. Each show made a point to treat their star as a person first and hero second (if that). It never bothered with spoon-feeding the audience the character’s “blackness” or “femininity” or “handi-capable-ness” because doing so would be a disservice to the character as well as the viewers. If the Saturday Morning Cartoons of yore were any indication, tokenization was a very obvious pitfall to avoid for the creative teams involved.

iron_fist

So what makes Iron Fist such an exception? Besides the “damned if you do, damned if you don’t” natural problem of having to adapt an outdated premise to appeal to mainstream and hardcore audiences, I personally believe going the route of recasting our titular character as an Asian-American is just too much for even today’s modern mindsets. While women, black people, and (to an admittedly lesser degree) the disabled have been successfully integrated into American society, the concept of an Asian main character, not to mention one that’s a superhero, is just too novel of a concept for American-made live-action dramas. And taking into account where Asians fall in modern America, it’s not too surprising. Rather than trying to integrate into societies, it’s become more commonplace for first-gen Asians in America to stick together as a community. Things like Chinatown, Japantown, and Koreatown where the common language spoken is anything but English serve as a safe haven to the according immigrants, but this strange, unapproachable-except-for-touristy-visits, foreign… thing for anyone else. To write a story trying to immerse the audience in that world when that world is so inherently unapproachable to any other American (read: white people) is apparently too big of a hurdle to even bother trying to jump over.

Sure, the counter-argument would be that you’re playing into stereotypes to have an Asian know martial arts, but if every prior Marvel Netflix series were able to successfully establish, break, and exceed stereotypes, I honestly don’t see why Iron Fist wouldn’t dare to follow suit.

But whatever, man, I’ve got plenty of other series to binge on already.

#Pick #A #Side–Captain America: Civil War Review

Captain America: Civil War is a thematically confused mess of a movie.

Ok, maybe that was coming off a bit harsh. As many gripes as I had with the movie, the things it did well were enjoyable. Newcomers Spider-Man and Black Panther felt comfortably familiar to the series and were able to be of oddly large amount of use to the movie’s plot. The big superhero fight the title alludes to was stupid yet gratifying to watch (seeing Spider-Man piggyback off War Machine was just one of its many highlights). And on the whole it made me excited for the future of Marvel’s movies rather than anxious over the burnout that you’d expect come thirteen of these movies over the course of 8 years.

That said, there was plenty wrong with Civil War, too.

civil war title
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3 Things I Liked in the Live-Action Attack on Titan Movie

Was the live-action Attack on Titan movie bad? No. Would I watch the live-action Attack on Titan movie again? No.

(insert "they wasted all their budget on trailer-specific scenes" joke here
Now that that’s out of the way, here’s three movie-only details that were pretty enjoyable: Read more of this post

Spoiler-Free Review: The Amazing Spider-Man 2

As ultimately forgettable as the first Amazing Spider-Man movie was, I do appreciate the fact that it stuck closely to certain aspects of the main Spidey universe. Peter Parker tinkering away in his basement working on things besides flashy spider-themed spandex, mechanical web-shooters, Gwen Stacy in all her thigh-high-wardrobey-goodness (I actually don’t know how canon that is, but it does fit her character at least aesthetically)… Sure it had its problems, but as a whole, it was inoffensive and certainly wasn’t a disaster.

My opinion remains with its sequel.

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Spoiler-Free Review: Gravity

With movies in general, it’s easy to get caught up in a running list of “things” needed to keep audiences entranced through the entirety of the film, whether it be from dialogue, special effects, constantly shifting scene locations, cast size, etc. So to see a modern day movie take a rather minimalistic approach to their story-telling while still maintaining a quality story is nothing short of amazing.

Gravity 2013 Movie Poster

As suggested by the trailer, Gravity is something of a disaster movie, with all the disaster focusing primarily on a one Ryan Stone (played by Sandra Bullock). Stone is a medical engineer who’s received six months of appropriate astronaut training and is currently in space alongside some other astronauts when they’re unexpectedly hit with by a cluster of debris from a destroyed satellite. Having been cut off from Mission Control, Stone must rely on her own limited training to get herself out of this fix.

Now on paper, it sounds like some standard stuff that isn’t exactly new to the world of movies. But where Gravity truly shines is in its execution. Rather than keeping to a standard big budget movie-telling format of having a large cast and cutting from mission control to the characters in space, the entirety of the movie focuses on Stone’s character. No cuts to what’s going on at Earth; no flashbacks when Bullock’s character starts giving some backstory and reason for viewers to care for her well-being… actually, I’m pretty sure the camera makes a point of either keeping focused on Stone, or switching to a first-person perspective as Stone fumbles her way through one disaster after another (really, the movie gives Bullock little to no time to breathe either due to the stress or the literal inability to breathe because well… space situations can do that). And it’s that amount of focus that gives the movie a real sense of isolation from the world, in both a beautiful and frightening manner.

You would think that with the movie having such a focused perspective for its story-telling that it would result in certain scenes becoming too chatty (or worse: too exposition-y), but the dialogue is actually kept at a rather nice balance alongside the destruction sequences. The somewhat smug and chatty Astronaut Kowalski (George Clooney is right at home as this guy) properly sets the stage and overall feel as we’re introduced to their world in space and doesn’t come off as too overbearing, keeping in mind that Bullock is the true star of the movie. Bullock’s character keeps to herself, but as she realizes the fix she’s gotten into, she begins to take a more proactive role, relying solely on what she herself is capable of doing given the situation and the handful of metaphorical bones thrown at her. Her acting is spot-on from beginning to end, (for the feminists out there) her character of Ryan Stone proves to be a very strong, independent, and capable person, and (for the dudes out there) she looks pretty good doing it, without coming off as ludicrously fanservice-y (#demlegs).

Action (er, “destruction”) scenes are over-the-top, but service the plot well, as space debris is whipped and turned about without coming off as wanton destruction. Coming from someone that hasn’t exactly been wowed by 3D in movies, I actually really enjoyed it this time around. Like the special effects themselves, the 3D is treated in such a manner that directly services the plot and is consistent throughout the film, so you don’t feel like you’re cheated “3D wise” by just having the one scene that looks really good in 3D and the rest just kinda being okay. While there was clearly a large amount of special effects used, you are never given the feeling that the effects were put first, with story second. Everything is kept tight, and compliments each other accordingly.

My one semi-complaint would be the handful of baby imagery. While I understand how this relates to Stone’s backstory, I found it coming off as more of a stretch than anything else. Regardless, it does prove to be some of the most beautiful shots/scenes in the movie, so I won’t make too much of it.

As a whole, Gravity was a somewhat simple story, executed in a unique and even beautiful manner, giving a real feeling of isolation in the vastness of space.

Movie adaptations of videogames are bad? OBJECTION! Live Action Ace Attorney Review

I don’t know what’s been in the water in Japan, but of the live action adaptations of previous works to have come from the country, I can’t think of any as of late that I’ve found particularly well… good. The 20th Century Boys trilogy definitely had the production value, but was ultimately mediocre at best. The same can be said about the live action Beck, Solanin and Bunny Drop movies, all of which stuck decently well to the source material, but just didn’t have that certain flair that made the movies themselves work as not just adaptations, but good movies in their own rights.

So you’d think with something as ridiculous as an Ace Attorney movie, I’d be subject to yet another mediocre adaptation. We’re talking about a movie based on a videogame… not only that, but the creative team behind the movie actually decided to stick with the characters’ over-the-top wardrobes and hairdos. The last time I remember an adaptation doing something like that was back in the live action Speed Racer adaptation, which pretty much solidified my opinion that it is impossible to directly bring over something so off-the-wall crazy into a live action setting without being distracting/silly/seizure-inducing.

And yet for some reason, the Ace Attorney film pulls it off with such finesse that you wouldn’t even think that such was ever considered a problem in previous works.

Ace Attorney Live Action PosterComing from a person who hasn’t played any of the games, I can say with confidence that the movie does an excellent job of building interest in the franchise for non-fans such as myself not because it was so bad that I felt the need to see the superior source material, but well… the opposite. Ace Attorney does an excellent job of not only establishing its characters and surroundings, but also pulls off weaving such an intricate story that remains interesting from start to finish.

Characters from titular ace attorney Wright and prosecutor/rival Edgeworth to Butz and Gumshoe to even random secondary and even tertiary characters in the background look like they’re pulled right out of the videogames, wacky hair and all, and yet for some inexplicable reason, none of the designs are distracting (with some exception to the court’s judge character, who is so hilariously and intentionally deadpan that I’ll let it slide). Rather, the offbeat designs bounce well off the equally insane courtroom, which looks perfectly normal with the exception of the gigantic holograms showing various pieces of evidence throughout the trials that take up most of the story.

The handful of times the characters traverse outside of the courtroom, we are treated with equally alluring settings and flashbacks that also look relatively normal with the exception to some slight quirks. You’d think with the majority of the movie taking place in the courtroom, however, that things would get stale fast, but with the story’s near breakneck pacing (admittedly, I needed my more game-familiar friends to break things down for me) and lovable characters across the board, the total run-time of 135 minutes goes by like that.

To say that Ace Attorney is a good videogame-gone-movie still wouldn’t say much considering the absolute crapfests of game/movies preceding it. Rather, it is an excellent movie in its own right from beginning to end and is not only the first live action Japanese movie I thoroughly enjoyed, but the first movie adaptation of a videogame that I sincerely wish gets a sequel.

Why I Didn’t Like “Man of Steel”

I watched the midnight showing of Man of Steel a couple weeks back and just couldn’t bring myself to do a post about it because it left that bad of a taste in my mouth. But upon seeing that the movie is actually collecting something even remotely resembling mixed reviews, I just felt the need to get my own thoughts out on the matter. Because, y’know… it’s clearly an important hot-button issue that needs to be addressed.

man of steel poster

From the get-go, things do start at least somewhat promising, with the Kryptonian Zod pretty much establishing his spot as the movie’s main baddie by killing Super Man’s dad as the baby Supes is sent off to Earth before the planet Krypton explodes. But then you begin to realize that the sense of urgency you’d expect with a dying planet is seemingly nonexistent (even the characters that know about their own planet exploding really take their damn time getting stuff done) and you immediately start to fear how the rest of the movie will play out.

As Clark crash lands on Earth, we’re treated to an incredibly choppy sense of storytelling, as we jump back and forth from Clark traveling the world as a drifter, to his earlier days trying to adjust to life as a normal schoolboy, hiding any signs of his powers. You would think these scenes would bounce well off each other and make you really develop a liking to Clark and see him as more than just this indestructible super-being, but every one of these scenes ends up falling flat, never going that one more mile to really make you feel for the character.

Things only become more muddled when secondary characters are slowly introduced. Characters like the love interest in Louis Lane and her gruff boss at the Daily Planet seem to only exist to detract from Clark’s main story, and the fact that they’re played by Amy Adams (of Enchanted fame) and Laurence Fishbourne (The Matrix among other things) just makes things that much more awkward to watch. Adams’ acting is decent, but comes off as too “Disney Princess”—the exact opposite of the fast-talking snarky Louis Lane that the movie tried to portray in terms of her given lines. Meanwhile, Fishbourne has something of a problem balancing his emotions, as he goes from over-the-top jerk boss, to caring older gentleman during a time of crisis (he has a similar problem in his role on NBC’s Hannibal). The only casting among the main characters that didn’t feel out of place was Henry Cavill as the Man of Steel, Super Man. Though his performance is definitely wasted here due to lines that seem to be inconsistent with the tone of the film in general.

As the movie continues, Clark finds what fans will identify as The Fortress of Solitude, where the movie’s script realizes that not much of a plot has gone on until this point and decides to dump everything then and there. Rather than working up to the point that he deserves donning his iconic red and blue outfit, Clark is literally presented the suit as something of a birthright. And once Zod makes his predictable appearance on Earth, things further degenerate into a generic big budget action film (complete with a death machine that emanates skrillex-y wubwub sounds), with some of the most boring fight scenes I’ve seen as of late. You’d think with all the big time movies working in stylized action into their works, that Man of Steel would hire a halfway decent fight choreographer, but no. As super-powered as the hero and baddies were, their clashes were on the lower end of entertaining.

But what really killed this movie was the overall sense that the people involved just didn’t have an understanding of what it means to be Clark Kent. Now, I’m not an avid Super Man fan myself, but watching the movie just gave me the impression that Super Man was written by someone that was probably as well versed on his lore as well… me. Sure, he looked the part, but the writing clearly didn’t make the most out of the character and what he stands for. Too late into the movie are we presented with little moments where Clark talks of being a small-town kid when we should have been presented with not only moments that demonstrated that trait, but also how said trait affects how he uses his powers and how the humans around him react to it. What we got instead were a handful of mishmashed flashbacks that were severely lacking in a common theme that you can stick with throughout the movie.

I can’t speak for the hardcore fans, but to me, Super Man is essentially a tragic mulatto, struggling between being a Kryptonian and being an Earthling. Man of Steel treats Super Man like it wasn’t sure what to make of Clark in the first place, so why should I even be invested? Plenty of people have already called this latest movie out for lacking a soul, but there honestly isn’t a better way to phrase it than that.

Spoiler-Free Review: Star Trek Into Darkness

When JJ Abrams was tasked with making the Star Trek franchise commercially accessible back in 2009, I’d say he did a pretty good job—characters and general situations that I’ve grown accustomed to seeing in parodies rather than in their native habitat suddenly became relevant and… well, I don’t wanna say “cool” since that would be pushing things, but at the least the franchise was back in the public eye for doing what it did best in the form of a blockbuster movie. And while the sequel didn’t necessarily disappoint in that respect either, I just felt like Star Trek: Into Darkness didn’t tap into the potential that is almost fifty years of source material to work with.

Star Trek: Into Darkness posterThis time around, the crew aboard the Enterprise isn’t the only ones in direct danger, as an unknown terrorist has their eyes set on the entirety of Starfleet. Revelations are made, people are killed, betrayals are had, and things are decently wrapped up in around 2 hours. I wouldn’t say it’s an incredibly by-the-book sci-fi movie, but it isn’t exactly groundbreaking by any means either. Similar to the previous Abrams Star Trek, all the tension and plot-building in Into Darkness isn’t your typical gradual climb up to a climax. Things slow down, speed up, halt completely, and meander in an almost aimless sense. Then again, the main characters are a crew of explorers, so such an aesthetic works to a certain degree. Still, something about the movie just didn’t sit right with me.

Perhaps the movie suffers from the standard sequel problem of simply seeing if it can get away with more of the same. Yes, performances are great, settings and costumes are visually stunning (Uhura’s covert “civilian” clothes are disgustingly stylish), and there were a good couple of lines that really did give me chills from their emotional impact, but nothing seemed to try to go above and beyond expectations. This is especially apparent in the character arcs of Kirk and Spock. Yes, their characters have already been established in the previous movie, but that only makes me wonder how said characters are further developed this time around, and (more importantly) how that will tie in with the story. What we get is an initial setup of Kirk and Spock’s conflicting opinions on following Starfleet protocol, only to have the general theme lost halfway through for the sake of plot twists, and then shoehorned back in for the finale. Maybe it’s not as bad as I put it, but I hesitate to say it’s spectacular by any means.

I did enjoy seeing where Earth sits in the Trek universe, with the first terrorist attack being on a Starfleet building in London, though it also led to my wondering why the scope was immediately broadened to space for the majority of the movie. From the get-go, it is made clear that the villain’s plans had some direct affect on Starfleet as a whole, so to have things solely focused on the Enterprise crew made it seem as if a lot of off-screen goings-on were being skipped over. Maybe such consequences will be told in the next movie, but to hold off until then results in the story not being as strong as it could have been.

Another point I must bring up are the little nods towards the old-school Star Trek material. Now, I am by no means well or even decently versed in Trek lore, but internet humor has made me privy to at least a handful of tidbits, nearly all of which were paid homage to in some shape and form in this movie resulting in my just being taken out of the movie’s world if only for a bit. That’s not to say little easter eggs in movies are horrible; if that were true, Stan Lee’s IMDB page would be considerably shorter. The problem is when the easter egg goes from being in the background (Iron Man’s Ultimate Comics suit in the third movie) to the front and center of the action (“I’m the Juggernaut, bitch”). And in the case with Into Darkness, one particular scene is near identical to a certain scene from an old-school Trek movie, to the point that any seriousness and emotional impact intended was just lost on me—a guy who at best has seen one or two DVR’d old Trek movies.

As a whole, Star Trek: Into Darkness is a serviceable action/sci-fi movie. Though from a franchise as long-running as this that has only just recently been put back on the map with the Abrams movies, you would think that absolutely every effort would be made to make sure the franchise doesn’t go back into obscurity. I wouldn’t exactly call this a popcorn movie, since the occasional Trekkie jargon does involve some form of thinking on the viewer’s part, but maybe that’s just the direction that popcorn movies are taking as of late.

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