TV Block Progress Report: The ’90s Are All That

I’ll admit it. I probably stopped watching this block for a couple months by this point.

I’ll also admit that this primarily has to do with where I define myself in the broad spectrum of the term “fan” in the slowly-not-becoming-so-exclusive club that identifies itself with ‘90s pop culture. While I enjoyed my Rugrats and Pete & Pete, and even went as far as picking up an official release here and there to support the shows I liked, I could never hold a steady conversation with another person about the topic without eventually rolling my eyes at the other speaker. I wish I could find some other cause, but I think my main reason for this is simply because I don’t wear my fandom on my sleeve and as such just can’t relate to the other fans that will gush at the mere mentioning of ‘90s Nick. It’s not that I’m ashamed of my interest in any way; it’s just that I express my appreciation for the “genre” as a whole in a different manner than most—who are the clear target demographic of this block in the first place.

The guys at Viacom (or whoever’s in charge of the programming block) realize that the demographic that would watch these shows is vastly different from the one that would purchase the home video release of said shows and uses it to its advantage… I guess. Here’s where I’d make a long-winded transition, but I’m gonna try something different and springboard off a quote from nickandmore.com:

Overall, I think the programming block, meant to be a place for twentysomethings to relive their youth, is sadly not where it could be.

Nickelodeon has such a large programming vault (as do the other networks, but lets leave the attention on Nick here), yet they’ve used so little of it in the past year on TeenNick.

The ‘90s Are All That have (for the most part) been airing the same handful of ‘90s Nick shows since the block first started a year ago last Wednesday, which can be seen as a blessing and curse of sorts. On the one hand you have the fans that are pleased with whatever show is aired on the block as long as it falls into the ‘90s Nick category. As such, there wouldn’t be any complaints from these types of viewers since they’re so smitten with the ‘90s bug resulting in the guys behind the programming probably patting themselves on the shoulder and calling a job well done even though they’re doing the bare minimum for the block.

It’s one thing to make a programming block of select ‘90s Nick shows and airing them night after night indefinitely, but it’s another thing entirely to flesh it out and make the best out of what they have at hand. Nickelodeon literally has dozens upon dozens of programs, even taking out the shows like Inspector Gadget and Tiny Toons that technically aired on the channel but weren’t Nick shows and yet The ‘90s Are All That is being composed of the same shows every night. For a block that has such a vast pool of shows to pick and choose from, it’s a shame that they’ve limited themselves only to a select few. I’m not entirely sure if it’s due to legal reasons or what, but either way it’s a shame that the block is where it is even though it has the potential to become so much more.

Vary the lineup; bring back some old bumpers; get some retrospectives from relevant people; do anything to bring this block out of the slump that the masses have become so accustomed to.

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About daemoncorps
Gabe (daemoncorps) has been writing about anime and the like since 2005, but has been babysat by it for much longer. He primarily spends his days distracting himself on twitter or writing for Fandom Post until he realizes he has a weekly webcomic (tapastic.com/series/scramblebouquet) to work on. He also just finished writing his first full-length graphic novel about unemployment (https://tapastic.com/episode/293804).

One Response to TV Block Progress Report: The ’90s Are All That

  1. Pingback: TV Block Progress Report: Toonami (2012) « DaemonCorps

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